Modern Machine Shop

MAR 2017

Modern Machine Shop is focused on all aspects of metalworking technology - Providing the new product technologies; process solutions; supplier listings; business management; networking; and event information that companies need to be competitive.

Issue link: https://mms.epubxp.com/i/790035

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 26 of 156

24 MMS March 2017 mmsonline.com RAPID TRAVERSE Machining Technology in Brief few machine tools and injection molding machines throughout the facility. Mr. Schuster says this company's CEO sought to test the device's speed at one point by grabbing a part at random from the shop floor—a part no one was yet prepared to measure—and asking a production employee to inspect it. To comply, the employee had to locate the CAD file for the par t that included product and manufacturing information (PMI), so the manufacturer's own file organization contrib- uted to the speed in this test. Including this retrieval, the complete time for the CEO to obtain an inspec- tion report clocked in at eight minutes. The appliance-like speed and simplicity of the device is the result of at least three patented technologies, plus the work of two formerly sep- arate companies. While Laser Design was work- ing on one technology, another laser scanning technology firm, Cyber Optics, was working on another. Recognizing they were pursuing separate pieces of the same puzzle, they joined, with Laser Design becoming a Cyber Optics company. The three technologies are: • Software for knitting together 3D scans from various angles into a single model. This piece was Laser Design's development, Mr. Schuster says. He notes the software combines laser scans not through best-fit analysis (which is typical), but instead according to the machine's own encoder feedback as the scans are taken. • Multiple Reflection Suppression (MRS), which was developed by Cyber Optics. This technology accomplishes many things, he says, but its most significant contribution includes avoiding the typical scan noise errors associated with scanning shiny surfaces. • Capability for scanning accurately through glass. This third and final piece is what enables a complete 3D scan. The part sits unfixtured on a rotating glass plate within the device while it is measured using a projection sensor above the par t and one below it that scans through the glass. Mr. Schuster says the only input needed for automated programming and inspection with the CyberGage is a CAD file with PMI data. The presence of this information within the part model me ans no manual programming is required, because PolyWorks can interpret the scan data into the measurements needed to validate the part according to its PMI. Geometric complexity is no obstacle to the scan, and in fact, the device is an ef fective solution for rapidly measuring complex parts. The primary limitations instead relate to the device's capacity—inspection volume is 200 mm in diameter by 100 mm tall—along with the light-related properties of the part. Both highly reflective parts and transparent ones can prove challenging to scan. Laser Design, call 952-252-3479 or visit laserdesign.com. Leveling Up for Machine Installation and Beyond BY S TE PH A N I E H E N D R I XS O N M achine tools are finely tuned instruments capable of achieving high levels of preci- sion. But the machine is only as good as its setup, and the accuracy with which it is installed is just as important as its build. Machine tool builders have specified standards for what is acceptable for an installed machine. According to Don Schmedake of Hurco, his c o m p a n y 's m a c h i n e t o o l s m u s t a c h i e v e squareness within 0.0005 inch for the X, Y and Z axes. "If the machine isn't level, I'm not going to attain that goal," he says. "The machine geom- etry will never come into spec." Mr. Schmedake now provides technical sup- port for Hurco customers from the company's Indianapolis, Indiana, headquarters but recently ser ved as a field ser vice engineer per forming

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Modern Machine Shop - MAR 2017